Service Oriented Programming and DSLs?

by martin 19. November 2008 22:20

I recently attended Dev Connections and was shown the benefits of decoupling business logic from aspects such as authentication, authorization, security, transaction support, threading model, instantiation model, encoding, and transport mechanism.  In Juval Lowy's Windows Communication Framework (WCF) seminar, I was exposed to the idea of our software tools and runtime environments evolving to allow us to utilize these functionalities in business application without even doing anything additional.  Juval reiterated that WCF is not just about web service and explained many of the benefits that you would get for using WCF even on an application that does not span CPUs.  These benefits include fault tolerance, fault screening (or formal fault contracts), contract first development, and the benefit of a thought out framework that provides separation of concerns for many aspects of enterprise software development.

At PDC at the end of October, Microsoft announced Azure, Oslo, and Dublin.  So Azure, or the "cloud", will let you deploy and run your production applications easily and supposedly allow them to dynamically scale up on-the-fly as demand warrants.  I heard this maybe being accomplished by dynamically spawning new virtualized servers from software and data that are stored in a massive partitioned and redundant sql server cluster (or I may have dreamt all this).  Oslo is the hybrid (both visual (Quadrant) and textual) programming environment for creating and using custom Domain Specific Languages (DSL) and Dublin is a SQL server based repository and runtime environment for the resulting Oslo DSL programs and data structures.  The DSLs are written in Mgrammer ("Mg") and the modeling language itself is just called "M".  There is a silverlight video from MS on http://modelsremixed.com/ that shows the history of "modeling", starting with prehistoric times.  In it, you will notice that one of the process models that they show is comprised of a component with the tiny logo that reads "Wcf" in its top left corner.

So that is a lot of new information to absorb.... but what does this all mean?  Will we all really be orchestrating business process workflows written in "vertical" DSLs?  Where does BPEL fit in?  Is this Microsoft's killer-app ESB?

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/oslo/default.aspx

 

 

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ASP.Net | C# | Windows

SOAP interoperability problem with .Net consuming Axis ???

by martin 7. November 2008 23:21

It seems that the auto generated proxy classes for SOAP (Webreferences) seem to require the root element of the response SOAP body to be fully qualified by namespace by default.  One trick to overcome this that worked for me was to use wsdl.exe to create editable classes rather than using webreference.  Then I was able to remove the ResponseNameSpace attribute from the System.Web.Services.Protocols.SoapDocumentMethodAttribute attribute annotation.  This seem to allow the temporary infrastructure xml deserializer class to work correctly by making the call to XmlReader.IsStartElement return true for Axis generated SOAP responses that do not specify a namespace at all.

wsdl.exe /language:CS /out:CustomWebServiceProxy.cs  AxisServiceWsdl.wsdl 
( /namespace:MyAppNameSpace ) 

You can also remove the System.Diagnostics.DebuggerStepThroughAttribute attribute annotations so that you can step into (F-11 key) the runtime generated proxy code to see and debug the serializer and deserializer in action.  This comes in very useful when you are receiving a valid soap response over the network but your return object is null upon returning back from the webservice call.  I had to do this when all I was getting was null and had no error messages to grasp at.

 

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